Review – Persuasion by Jane Austen

2017: 67
4 of 5 stars
Published in 1814

I never read Jane Austen’s books when I was younger. What sparked my interest, along with a lot of others’, was after watching the British mini series Pride and Prejudice including *that* scene, you know the one, Colin Firth popping out of a pond after a swim, standing there, soaked to the skin in a white shirt. Yes. I also loved another BBC production, Persuasion that featured rugged Ciaran Hinds as Captain Wentworth. Let’s not forget Alan Rickman as Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility. If you’re spotting a trend here, you won’t be far wrong.

But whatever it was that lured me to pick up the original material, it was worth it. I quite enjoyed the Jane Austen books I read. With some classic books, I find the language a bit difficult to process in my modern brain. Dickens mystifies me. Jane Austen is much easier to read and her “old fashioned” turn of phrase comes across as elegant. I have decided to reread the ones I’ve already read and finish the set of all her novels. There aren’t that many, she only lived a short life. Can you imagine what she would have produced if she’d lived even just 10 or 20 years longer than her final age of 42? This year is the 200th anniversary of her death so there’s been a lot of publicity around. What better time to undertake this reading project?

So the first novel out of the gate is Persuasion which was published in 1818 after her death. It is the story of Anne Elliott and her family. Anne had fallen in love with a sailor, Frederick Wentworth, seven years before at the age of 19 and they were engaged to be married but her  father, older sister and, primarily, a family friend, Lady Russell,  interfered and persuaded Anne to break off the engagement. Wentworth was not from a family of good background and he was not rich. It just would not do. Anne never married though her younger sister did. The family’s finances have been sinking lower and lower since the death of Anne’s mother, now no longer there to prevent her Baronet father from living beyond his means. Lady Russell has been consulted and in turn has consulted Anne who has been running the home and they have devised a plan.

Kellynch Hall will be let out and they will rent cheaper rooms in Bath. The Napoleonic wars have recently ended and Kellynch Hall has been let by an Admiral Croft and his wife, Sophie. Lo and behold, Captain Frederick Wentworth is Sophie’s brother and he has returned from the war a rich man. These are the days when officers and sailors alike can still profit from war.  It’s clear that Anne still loves him and if he still has feelings for her, he does not act on them, still resentful of her allowing her family to persuade her to break off with him.

Anne’s family moves through society,  with long suffering Anne preferring a quieter life so she tends to stay in the background when she can, avoiding the apparent resentful and accusatory glares of Wentworth whenever possible. The heir to Kellynch Hall, William Elliott,  has also reappeared and may be looking for a wife. Anne’s sister Mary’s two sisters-in-law are also anxious to be married and one of them seems to have caught the eye of Wentworth.

Anne herself is generally taken for granted by her family, dismissed by them when they think of her at all and used by them when they need her to do something. She is not beautiful like her older sister nor married with children like her younger one though her younger sister, Mary,  does show more love to Anne even if Mary’s selfish side that depends on Anne’s generosity for child minding and help in the home.  Anne does not have the skills to shine in society and lives a quiet life though that may not be what her heart truly desires. She seems to have an adventurous soul but for women, that’s not an easy dream to follow in those days.

Will Anne and Wentworth finally reconcile their past and make a future together? What do you think?! It’s not really a spoiler to say this has a happy ending. All of Austen’s books pretty much do. The girl always gets the man she desires. (SPOILER)  Anne and Wentworth’s reconciliation comes after a romantic letter about the fidelity of the hearts of men wherein Frederick declares himself to Anne.

Jane Austen could write about Society with all it’s rules, banality and put-on airs and graces and nails it firmly through her own real-life observations. She has a sharp humour woven through the narrative and quite clearly a romantic heart.

Family tree for the characters of Persuasion, courtesy of Wikipedia. Click on the photo for a larger view