Review: Seven Days of Us – Francesca Hornak

2018: 13
4.5 of 5 stars
Published 2017

The Birch family are going to be spending Christmas at the country house in Norfolk, all of them together for the first time in years but it may be too much of a good think. You see,they are quarantined for 7 days when their daughter, Olivia, returns after several months on a medical team treating an insidious virus in Africa. Olivia seems to be a bit cut off from her family, having her own life but she’s looking forward to her future. Her younger sister, Phoebe has finally become engaged to George so her world is looking up, too. Andrew has discovered he has a son but hasn’t told anyone,not even his wife, Emma, who also has a secret that she’s keeping. There, then. It’s got my interest and attention.

The long lost son shows up, anxious to meet his family and he’s thrown into the mix and he really is the cat dumped in among the pigeons as they all get used to each other. The secrets all dribble out, one by one like little pop explosions. Are they going to blow the family apart or make them stronger?

This is a debut novel and just the style I do enjoy. I’d love to read another book about this family. I enjoyed all the characters. The setting could have been any old manor house in rural England set near a village. I wanted to know more about the family members and hear more about their stories  and I thought it was a nice, light read. Slightly predictable? Yes but these types of books usually do have happy endings. It’s why I read them.

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Review: American War by Omar El Akkad

2018:12
4 of 5 stars
Published 2017

This debut novel will keep you thinking long after you turn that last page. Set at the end of the 21st century, America is in the depths of a second Civil War fought over fossil fuel that the North wanted outlawed and the Southern section refused to give up.  The map of the country as it’s known today looks very different as most of the coastal areas are under water. Extreme weather still takes its toll on the country.  There are unmanned but armed drones that dot the skies, raining explosives down.  There are soldiers that come, night or day.  At the end of the war, there was then a terrible plague that swept the country. War is hell. We know all this at the start of the book. The rest of the book fills in the blanks, told by the nephew of the protagonist as he looks back on his own life and the woman that influenced him and saved his life.

Sounds grim. It’s gonna get grimmer. Sarat is a child at the beginning of the book. She and her mother, brother and twin sister are taken to a refugee camp when her father is killed. From here, we get an insight as to what life is like for ordinary people during wartime. As Sarat gets older, we see the effects of living to survive has on her and her family. Sarat is recruited to the Southern (Red) manifesto, having continually lost people she loves. It takes a toll on a child and she is easily turned into a hard core revel who takes on the North faction (Blue) as she is instructed. If this were an action movie, it would involve high leg kicking, num chucks and lots of explosions but it is more underhanded and nefarious than that. We watch Sarat through her life, her determination, her obsession, her willpower and her single minded beliefs. Her fate is inevitable.

The book is very well written but while not a pleasant read, it’s a very good one just the same. It’s bleak but it’s also somewhat believable that the near-ish future could come to that point so it has that touch of reality to it. There are a number of topics that were not brought into the story but that probably would have made the book too long and would distract the reader from what the author wanted to say, a warning that within 50 years, this could be the way it is, or similar.

This is one of the books shortlisted for the Canada Reads competition at the end of March.

Review: Remembering the Bones – Frances Itani

2018:11
5 of 5 stars
Published in 2007

This is Georgie’s story. Georgina Witley. She’s nearly 80 and has been invited to participate in a formal lunch at Buckingham Palace because her birthday is the same day as that of Queen Elizabeth I along with the other 99 guests who are also invited. But Georgie only gets to the end of her road where she accidentally drives her car off the road and down into a steep ravine. Georgie is thrown from the car but is injured and has no way to alert anyone.

She spends several days there, with exposure to the elements. While her injuries may not be fatal, lack of food and especially water just might be. She tries to keep her mind alert by reciting the latin names of the bones in the body and remembering anecdotes from her life and her family, hoping to ward off the Grim Reaper who is ever inching closer. She doesn’t filter her memories through in chronological order as you might think. That’s just the way most minds work. She keeps herself motivated by talking ..to herself, to her late husband, to her mother and even to Death himself as she slowly inches her way to her vehicle, hoping for a little warmth and a way to sound the horn to alert someone for help.

Frances Itani writes exquisitely and she writes about women, women that are vastly different from each other but all have a very true and real presence.

Review: White Heat – M.J. McGrath

2018: 10
5 of 5 stars
Published 2017

White Heat takes place in a small settlement on Ellesmere Island in the most northern part of Canada there is. The tundra is bleak, the wind is chilly at the best of times and can flashfreeze your skin at an instant’s notice.

Edie Kiglatu is a teacher and guide who takes curious tourists out on hunting expeditions. On one fateful expedition, while Edie was in the forest, one of her two tourists is killed but not by the other one. A few weeks later, the other tourist returns to try to find evidence and he, too, dies. Another tragedy closer to home shatters Edie. Grief and anger take over and she takes matters into her own hands when the local law authorities and tribal elders are more than willing to sweep it all under a rug. People are dying and Edie needs to find out why.

One thing I loved about this book was the excellent descriptions of the Northern environment and culture of the Inuit, what they believed, what they ate, their customs, and more. The writing and detail is so good that you really feel like seal blubber might actually be a tasty treat! These far northern settlements do not make for an easy life but for the First Nations that call it home, it’s the only way of life they know so they get on with it. Other people have arrived for a variety of reasons, to stay or just to visit.

The author is British but has done a lot of traveling including to Ellesmere Island where this book takes place. Her research feels meticulous and I would enjoy reading the other two books she has out about Edie.

Review: Tomboy Survival Guide – Ivan Coyote

2018: 9
4 of 5 stars
Published 2016

Ivan Coyote is a trans-man, or rather, “gender-box-defying adult” who is a writer, storyteller and stage performer. In this book, they reveal anecdotes from their life growing up in Whitehorse in Canada’s far north. There are stories about their family, stories about their friends, about meeting the general public when they’re on tour. There are letters  that touch the heart, answers that open your eyes, issues raised and explained, labels cast away because they don’t fit anyway.  Ivan was lucky in some respects. They had a loving family and the support network there for them.

I know several trans people so I’m familiar with some of the issues but I learned something from this book, too. I think it would be a very good book for young adults to read as well. A lot of Ivan’s shows are actually directed towards younger people, maybe to head them off before they become too entangled in labels. This was one of the Canada Reads 2018 books on the long list though it didn’t make the cut to the short list. Too bad, it’s certainly an eye opener, in a good way. Ivan’s stories of their childhood, discovering that they were meant  to be a boy and the hard road to get there,  the bullies, the battle of the bathrooms. We watch them persevere and become the person they were meant to. The road to get to that spot in life is bumpy but ultimately, for Ivan, they find their place in lifel

Review: Precious Cargo – Craig Davidson

2018:6
3.5 of 5 stars
Published 2016

The full title of this book is Precious Cargo: My Year Driving the Kids on School  Bus 3077 and it is a memoir of sorts of a man whose career had tanked and needed a job badly. He ends up driving a school bus carrying 5 children of various ages, all of whom have special needs which wasn’t what he expected to be doing. It turned out to be a wonderful experience for him, a real eye opener which, coincidentally, is the theme for this year’s Canada Reads competition. More or Less. It most definitely does tell a story of someone’s eyes being opened and seeing things in a new light and maybe for that reason, it did make the short list and will be one of the books in competition at the end of March.

The five passengers range in ages from 13 to about 16, maybe 17 at most. These kids have challenges they meet daily. Craig learns to accept their differences and support them, the little group end up being a tight knit one. He’s written this book several years after the year in the story and tells about the good times and the rough ones, describing the young people with sympathy and respect. He only gets to know what their lives are like from one point of view, not a lot of insight into it other than what he may observe or what the children tell him, if anything but he does his best to give them a positive experience for the time they have together every day.

I would have liked to find out what happened to the kids in the years up to when the book was written. It wasn’t realistic that Craig would have kept in touch with all the students but he did make particular friends with one boy in a wheelchair. Did they not ever see each other again? The experience has had a positive effect on Davidson, seeming to have bridged the gap between a man floundering to find himself and his career and one who has settled down and made a career in writing and obtained a happy family as well.

Review: Northanger Abbey – Jane Austen

2018:5
4 of 5 stars
Published 1818

Next up in my quest to read all of Jane Austen’s novels is Northanger Abbey. Unlike the other major works, I knew nothing about this one going in. I’ve never read it before nor have I seen any cinematic production of it.

This is Catherine Morland’s story. She’s a young woman from a modest family. She travels to Bath with family friends and there meets the shallow and ambitious Isabella Thorpe and her smarmy brother John. Catherine is naive and innocent. She does know her own mind, but tends to have a vivid imagination. She has her head turned a bit by the glamorous Isabella but resolutely rejects Henry’s attentions.

She also meets siblings Eleanor and Henry Tilney who are much nicer. They invite Catherine to stay with them at their family home, Northanger Abbey which sparks that vivid imagination due to Catherine’s love of sensational gothic horror novels that always take place in shadowy, old abbeys and castles. Once she has lived through several embarrassing situations where her imagination is her own worst enemy, she settles down and learns a few life lessons. The book ends happily as you would expect but it does wrap up a bit too suddenly, I think.

This was the first novel Ms. Austen wrote though it was not published until after her death. The plot isn’t quite as complex or layered as some of her other books but it’s enjoyable just the same. I am also using this for a Bingo 2018 square though may change it later on.